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Homeopathic Cancer Treatment: Research Published from 2013 to 2017

The evidence shows that patients, not physicians, are the primary impetus for the increasing call for homeopathic cancer treatment worldwide. In the countries where homeopathic treatment is available, treatment is often provided in the absence of good professional references on homeopathic cancer drugs.

The Evidence
Scientific Studies Show Tautotherapy is an Effective Treatment for Drug-Induced and Toxic Disorders

In a previous paper we have shown that tautopathic therapy has been a product and outcome of homeopathic practice ever since the classical era of homeopathy.2 Although minor controversies about the place tautopathy ought to maintain within homeopathic practice continue to the present time…

A New Year’s Open Letter to Edzart Ernst

Dear Dr. Ernst,

 

I am posting this response to your December 24 blog post (addressed to me) here on my blog as I have doubts as to whether or not you will publish my response on your own blog…

 

We here at Homeopathic Associates and The Homeopathic College would like to thank you for your open ‘Christmas card’ and your wishes for a Happy New Year, as well as for the publicity it provided us. We have been followers of your opinions for many years now and are delighted at the opportunity to engage in a dialogue.

 

 

 

 

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Quantum Entanglement in Homeopathic Trials?

Most homeopathic studies seek to investigate whether homeopathic treatment can be shown to be effective within accepted methodologies of medicine, biology, chemistry and physics. However, there are theoreticians that argue that traditional research methods are inappropriate or insufficient to assess homeopathy. Calls for employing concepts from quantum physics in support of the ultra-dilution hypothesis, i.e. to counter accusations of relative paucity of positive results from homeopathic treatment in Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs), are made by several of these theorists, and even from within the community of homeopathic practitioners.

 

British homeopath Lionel Milgrom likes to dazzle his audiences with complex formulas derived from quantum physics to make his points. In a 2005 article1 he examined whether RCTs are redundant for testing the efficacy of homeopathy. He had observed that RCTs had yet to deliver unequivocal results demonstrating on the efficacy (or otherwise) of homeopathic remedies and individualized homeopathic prescribing. He asked if this could be caused by an implicit assumption inherent in RCT methodology that specific effects of a remedy and any nonspecific effects of consultation are independent of each other. He postulated a patient–practitioner–remedy (PPR) entanglement model as a necessary condition of homeopathic therapeutic interaction.

 

Milgrom called for alternatives to RCTs that can take into account possible entangled specific and nonspecific effects during trials of homeopathy. He theorized that since RCTs sometimes deliver positive results for the use of homeopathic remedies, that this may be caused by residual entanglement arising from homeopathic remedy manufacture. He proposed as one possibility that a homeopathic remedy “entails the entangled intention of those involved in its preparation” citing similar arguments by others. As a second option he proposed a surviving residual entanglement from remedy production but, ironically, as the cause of so-called Memory of Water (MoW) effects. Read more

Dihydroxy-isosteviol methyl ester of Pulsatilla nigricans extract reduces arsenic-induced DNA damage in testis cells of male mice: its toxicity, drug-DNA interaction and signaling cascades

Comments by The Homeopathic College: “A methyl ester of the homeopathic remedy Pulsatilla nigricans has shown promise in helping mitigate DNA damage done by arsenic induced reproductive poisoning! Good news for homeopathy!”

 

Originally published in the Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine: Volume 10, 2012   Issue 12

1. Asmita Samadder (Cytogenetics and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, India )
2. Jayeeta Das (Cytogenetics and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, India )
3. Sreemanti Das (Cytogenetics and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, India )
4. Durba Das (Cytogenetics and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, India )
5. Arnab De (Cytogenetics and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, India )
6. Kakali Bhadra (Entomology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, India )
7. Anisur Rahman Khuda-Bukhsh (Cytogenetics and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, India )

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the ameliorative efficacy of dihydroxy-isosteviol methyl ester (DIME) of Pulsatilla nigricans extract in arsenic-induced DNA damage in testis cells of mice.

METHODS: The mice were treated with sodium arsenite (SA) solution intragastrically at a dose of 20 mg/kg per day and examined at 30, 60, and 90 d after treatment. We divided SA-intoxicated mice into two sub-groups: one fed with DIME at a dose of 35 mg/kg and the other with 85% alcohol. We analyzed the expressions of apoptotic signal proteins like CYP1A1, p53 and caspase 3, ascertained the level of cellular and DNA damage and estimated the level of testicular-toxicity biomarkers. We studied the interaction of DIME with calf thymus DNA as target through circular dichroism spectra and melting temperature profiles.

RESULTS: We observed an elevation in all apoptotic and toxicity biomarkers leading to cellular and DNA damage in the SA-intoxicated mice which showed significant inhibition or reversal on administration of DIME. Results also showed that DIME interacted with DNA, bringing in discernible changes in structure and conformation.

CONCLUSION: DIME has potentials for therapeutic use in amelioration of arsenic-induced reproductive toxicity. Read more