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Quantum Entanglement in Homeopathic Trials?

Most homeopathic studies seek to investigate whether homeopathic treatment can be shown to be effective within accepted methodologies of medicine, biology, chemistry and physics. However, there are theoreticians that argue that traditional research methods are inappropriate or insufficient to assess homeopathy. Calls for employing concepts from quantum physics in support of the ultra-dilution hypothesis, i.e. to counter accusations of relative paucity of positive results from homeopathic treatment in Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs), are made by several of these theorists, and even from within the community of homeopathic practitioners.

 

British homeopath Lionel Milgrom likes to dazzle his audiences with complex formulas derived from quantum physics to make his points. In a 2005 article1 he examined whether RCTs are redundant for testing the efficacy of homeopathy. He had observed that RCTs had yet to deliver unequivocal results demonstrating on the efficacy (or otherwise) of homeopathic remedies and individualized homeopathic prescribing. He asked if this could be caused by an implicit assumption inherent in RCT methodology that specific effects of a remedy and any nonspecific effects of consultation are independent of each other. He postulated a patient–practitioner–remedy (PPR) entanglement model as a necessary condition of homeopathic therapeutic interaction.

 

Milgrom called for alternatives to RCTs that can take into account possible entangled specific and nonspecific effects during trials of homeopathy. He theorized that since RCTs sometimes deliver positive results for the use of homeopathic remedies, that this may be caused by residual entanglement arising from homeopathic remedy manufacture. He proposed as one possibility that a homeopathic remedy “entails the entangled intention of those involved in its preparation” citing similar arguments by others. As a second option he proposed a surviving residual entanglement from remedy production but, ironically, as the cause of so-called Memory of Water (MoW) effects. Read more

Prover Susceptibility and the Ascending Dose

Did randomized, placebo-controlled trials disprove the homeopathic proving hypothesis?

The verifications of Hahnemann convince those who have intellectual integrity for scientific conviction, who will not sacrifice their intellectual integrity to the idols of the day, who will repeat Hahnemann’s experimental verifications of his scientific observations and inductions as they should be repeated. Any other method than to take into the healthy body four drams of China twice a day to prove or to disprove the symptom similarity of China and intermittent fever is not a scientific experiment for the observation of Hahnemann.

–James Krauss, M.D., September 30, 1921, introduction to the Sixth edition of the Organon of Medicine; translated by William Boericke homeopathic research

Over the past decade, scientists and medical researchers have used sophisticated research methodologies in order to prove or disprove the efficacy of homeopathy. Based on their findings, editors of prestigious medical journals have concluded that there is no scientific validity to our therapeutic approach [1]. Given the high stakes of this research, the investigators’ command of the homeopathic subject matter and the underlying assumptions reflected in these studies need to be carefully examined. Read more